Not children anymore — but not teenagers either — 11-year-olds are on the cusp of adolescence. That gives them a unique perspective.

Age 11 is when you’re most passionate and optimistic, says Australian filmmaker Genevieve Bailey. It was her favorite age. She was the happiest then.

So in 2005, Bailey set out to document the lives of 11-year-old girls and boys around the world. The project took her six years. She traveled to 15 countries, from India to Morocco to the U.S. And she worked several jobs to pay for it all.

The result: I Am Eleven, a 90-minute documentary that offers people a look at the world through the eyes of dozens of 11-year-olds. The film has been screened around the world since its debut in 2011. It began playing in U.S. theaters this month.

"People in the international development world, especially funders, are always on the hunt for the ‘secret sauce’ that leads to successful aid programs.

A couple of weeks ago, Duncan Green, a strategic advisor for Oxfam in the UK, identified some new research along these lines. In his From Poverty to Power blog, Green wrote about a September paper entitled ‘Politically smart, locally led development’ from the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), an independent think tank in the UK.

ODI’s David Booth and Sue Unsworth looked at seven large, successful aid programs in search of the ingredients that, when combined, allow NGOs to succeed ‘despite the odds’ working against them.”

Read the full blog here: http://www.ikat.org/2014/10/07/october-7-2014-cai-uses-many-of-same-ingredients-found-in-secret-sauce/

Photos by Karin Ronnow.

The 2015 limited-edition Journey of Hope calendar is available for PRE-ORDER for $12!

In 2014, photographer Erik Petersen and CAI’s Communications Director Karin Ronnow documented CAI projects in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. The calendar includes stunning photography of CAI projects, plus explanations of CAI’s programs and a map of the areas we serve.

Proceeds from all calendar sales help CAI carry out its mission to promote and support community-based education, especially for girls, in remote regions of Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan.

To purchase your calendar today, click here: http://www.ikat.org/limited-edition-calendar/. Calendar orders are expected to ship by mid-November.

For additional questions or inquiries, please email info@ikat.org.

Here’s a quick sneak peek of what’s inside:

(All photos by Erik Petersen.)

The question of what sets us apart from other animals has occupied humanity for millennia, but only in the last few decades have animals gone from objects to be observed to fellow beings to be understood, with their own complex psychoemotional constitution.

Hardly anyone has contributed more to this landmark shift in attitudes — or, rather, this homecoming to the true nature of things — than Jane Goodall (b. April 3, 1934), who has spent the past half-century fusing together the scientific rigor of a pioneering primatologist with the spiritual wisdom of a philosopher and peace advocate.

In this wonderful short video from NOVA’s series The Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers, Dr. Goodall considers how empathy for other animals brings us closer to our highest human potentiality.

Maria Popova. 

*Read the full article, “Jane Goodall on Empath and How to Reach Our Highest Human Potential,” here:  http://www.brainpickings.org/2014/09/30/jane-goodall-empathy/

Today’s #GlobalChalkCampaign photo was taken in a leadership course at Montana State University this past spring. Stewart’s answer reads, “The fate of the world rests with our children.” And we agree!

Every child deserves the right to education in order to better change the world we live in. And we’d still love to hear from you! Send in your answers to the Global Chalk Campaign, and tell us why education should be a right for every child in the world. 
Today’s #GlobalChalkCampaign photo was taken in a leadership course at Montana State University this past spring. Stewart’s answer reads, “The fate of the world rests with our children.” And we agree!
Every child deserves the right to education in order to better change the world we live in. And we’d still love to hear from you! Send in your answers to the Global Chalk Campaign, and tell us why education should be a right for every child in the world. 
Today’s #GlobalChalkCampaign photo was taken at a CAI - supported school in Northern Pakistan. “Education is [the] basic right of every child,” his response reads. And we agree! Every child deserves access to education, regardless of their religion, country, gender, or ethnic identity. 

What do you think? Why should education be a right for every child in the world?

Photo courtesy Saidullah Baig.
Today’s #GlobalChalkCampaign photo was taken at a CAI - supported school in Northern Pakistan. “Education is [the] basic right of every child,” his response reads. And we agree! Every child deserves access to education, regardless of their religion, country, gender, or ethnic identity. 
What do you think? Why should education be a right for every child in the world?
Photo courtesy Saidullah Baig.
Today’s #GlobalChalkCampaign photo is of Molly, a fourteen-year-old student at Bozeman High School. Molly won the Montana State University’s Writer’s Voice Competition this summer. The competition is in junction with the MSU Convocation book, I am Malala. Molly wrote a beautiful poem titled “Seed,” inspired by the book (shown below). Both her Global Chalk Campaign photo and poem speak to the importance of global education. 

Great work, Molly!
SEED

By Molly Taylor
In the beginningI had no voiceI was simply a dandelion seedFloating on the breeze of others’ actionsBut the shot firedProved to send me on my own pathFollowing my own actionsSpeaking my own wordsBecause the purpose of a seed is to spread.

(Published with permission from Molly and her family)
Today’s #GlobalChalkCampaign photo is of Molly, a fourteen-year-old student at Bozeman High School. Molly won the Montana State University’s Writer’s Voice Competition this summer. The competition is in junction with the MSU Convocation book, I am Malala. Molly wrote a beautiful poem titled “Seed,” inspired by the book (shown below). Both her Global Chalk Campaign photo and poem speak to the importance of global education. 
Great work, Molly!

SEED

By Molly Taylor

In the beginning
I had no voice
I was simply a dandelion seed
Floating on the breeze of others’ actions
But the shot fired
Proved to send me on my own path
Following my own actions
Speaking my own words
Because the purpose of a seed is to spread.

(Published with permission from Molly and her family)